south america

Travel in Peru: Andahuaylas

Around four years ago I was employed as a photographer by MINCETUR, the tourist department of the Peruvian government. My role was to take tourist-friendly travel photos in various places around Peru. In addition to visiting the usual tourist destinations such as Cusco, the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu I also spent a week taking images in and around Andahuaylas. Click through the slideshow below for some of the travel images I took whilst in Andahuaylas:

Andahuaylas (Quechua Antawayllaanta copper, waylla meadow, "copper meadow") is a Peruvian city. It is the capital of the Andahuaylas Province in the Apurímac Region. It is known as the pradera de los celajes (Spanish for "prairie of colored clouds").

I spent a week in Andhuayalas exploring the various nearby villages and spending a lot of time in the small city itself. I didn’t see any other tourists during my entire stay in Andahuaylas. The culture was fascinating allowing for some interesting street photography such as this lady leading her pig to the market on a Sunday. I also managed to get some cinematic style street photos whilst practising with an anamorphic lens. The nearby Lake Pachuca and the archaeological site of Sóndor are also definitely worth a visit.

A blog about my week in Machu Picchu from the same trip can be found here as well as a blog about anamorphic photography. More of my photographs from Peru can be found on my websiteInstagramFacebook page and my Flickr account.  If you are interested in purchasing any prints, using an image online or would like further information please send me an email at: geraintrowlandphotography@gmail.com.  

Abstract Ocean Art Photography by Geraint Rowland

I am a big fan of this kind of abstract artwork, both in paintings and photography itself.  I think I first saw the technique being used by Surf photographer Morgan Maasen.  So, how do you make abstract style photographs?  Producing these abstract photographs is fairly easy, you simply take a photo of the ocean with a long exposure (up to a second or more depending on the light) whilst moving the camera from left to right (or right to left depending on you preference).  It's often a good way to create interesting and often beautiful shots at an often bland location.  In addition it is a technique which doesn't require a tripod, which I often can not be bothered to carry about with me.  Meaning you can still have fun, and produce some nice images whist others are carrying out long exposures with a tripod.  The end result being a painterly type of image often more similar to a painting, or piece of art than that of a photograph.  

An abstract water photo at sunset by Geraint Rowland Photography.

An abstract water photo at sunset by Geraint Rowland Photography.

The same technique can be used for trees, for example in a forest or jungle.  The trick is to move the camera in the same direction as the main lines within the frame.  For example, with the Ocean or Sea you go from left to right, following the horizon and the swell lines.  In a forest or woodland you would move the camera vertically from bottom to top, or top to bottom.  Click through the slideshow below for more examples of abstract ocean photography.  These photos were taken in Peru, England, Spain and West Africa.

I was involved in an 'Emerging Artists Exhibition' in Lima in 2013 in which I exhibited and sold several large abstract ocean art pieces which were printed on to canvas.  They were 1 metre by 1 metre in size and looked excellent hung on the wall.  More examples of my abstract ocean and surf art can be found here on my website.  

My abstract photography can now be bought on Etsy via LindaWisdomPhotoCo. The Red Lima sunset above for example can be purchased here.  More of my abstract photography can be found on my website, my Instagram, my Twitter and my Flickr account. If you are interested in purchasing any prints, using an image online or would like further information please send me an email at: geraintrowlandphotography@gmail.com.

The Floating Uros Islands of Lake Titicaca (Photo Essay for the Third Issue of Dezine Magazine)

At almost 4,000 metres above sea level on the border of Bolivia and Peru lies Lake Titicaca.  Lake Titicaca is impressive being both South America's largest lake and the highest navigable lake in the World.  

A Peruvian Child in colourful clothing plays on one of the floating reed islands on Lake Titicaca.

A Peruvian Child in colourful clothing plays on one of the floating reed islands on Lake Titicaca.

Seven kilometres from the shores of Puno on the Peruvian side are the floating Uros islands, home to the Uros or Uru people.  These unique islands are built entirely from the totora reeds that grow in the shallows of the lake.  The reeds are also used to build the homes they live in, the boats they travel in and handicraft they sell to visitors of the islands.  The semi edible reeds are even eaten by the locals who playfully refer to it as Uros icecream.  Some 1000 Uros people live across forty two islands on the lake where the younger children even attend school.  The island people make a living from fishing, textiles and in more recent years through selling crafts and tourism.   (Click through the images below)

The Uros islands are easy to reach with regular boats leaving throughout the day from Puno.  The islands are now firmly on the South American tourist trail, however they are well worth a visit.  Lake Titicaca has some of bluest skies I have ever seen and the islanders are amongst the most colourful.  I took these images over the course of a few days when I visited the islands last June.  Due to the vivid sky and the striking clothing of the locals the imagery is best portrayed in colour.  The Uros Islands really are a picture perfect travel destination.

More of my travel photography from Peru can be found on my website, my Instagram, and my Flickr account. If you are interested in purchasing any prints, using an image online or would like further information please send me an email at: geraintrowlandphotography@gmail.com.